Ref. Number: Several

Country: Cambodia

Period: from 9th to 14th Century

Material: Bronze

Khmer mirror

Khmer mirror

The bronze mirror’s slightly convex face and smooth, bright, clear surface feature a highly polished reflective surface. The techniques used to fashion the mirrors was cire-perdue(lost-wax).

Bronze mirrors were important items among the Khmer. They appear to have been particularly popular during the twelfth century and are represented in the raised hands of several apsaras carved in relief on the walls at Angkor Wat and Ta Prohm.

Khmer mirror

Khmer mirror

An Apsara holding a mirror is genre known from early Indian sculpture where it reflected the beauty of its owner, and may have also been intended as a possible offering to a deity. The motif must have been introduced into the Khmer artistic repertoire through some long distance contact with Indian sculptural traditions, along with the mirror type, as the similarities are too close to be coincidental. It is also seen in stone carving in Khmer temples, female deities or royal ladies, holding mirrors.

In Magic rituals, placed on an altar, it may inspire the viewer to reflect on the inner nature of things, the strangeness of phenomena and the ultimate reality of existence.

In Mahayana Buddhism, the bronze mirror is one of the eight offerings made to the Buddha: the mirror was presented by the goddess Bhasadhara when the Buddha preached a sermon.

Khmer mirror

Khmer mirror

Khmer mirror

Khmer mirror

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